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  • 1. What are laminate floors and how are they made?
     

    Laminate flooring is a versatile, durable, attractive flooring product that can take on several different appearances like stone or tile but it’s known mostly for looking like hardwood. Although they look the same, there is actually no solid wood used in the construction of a laminate floor. Laminates are made up of several layers of material fused together under high pressure. Most laminate flooring consists of a moisture resistant layer under a layer of HDF (high density fiberboard) or MDF (medium density fiberboard). This is topped with a high-resolution photographic image of a natural wood floor. It is then finished with an extremely hard, clear coating made from special resin-coated cellulose to protect it from wear and tear. Laminate flooring is perfect for anyone wanting a durable floor for a fraction of the price and installation time of a hardwood floor, but with the attractiveness of real hardwood. Laminate is also environment-friendly as it uses less wood in its construction and makes more efficient use of the wood fiber that is used.

  • 2. What is the difference between laminate flooring and hardwood flooring?
     

    Both laminate and hardwood flooring can be used to finish homes or provide flooring for offices and businesses. While some people still prefer hardwood, there are several advantages to choosing laminate. Solid hardwood (usually 3/4″ thick) must be installed only above grade to avoid warping and cupping. Laminates, however are more versatile giving you the look of wood above or below grade. Unlike hardwood, they can be installed over other flooring surfaces, meaning that you can install laminate over old kitchen linoleum or tile, provided the floor is clean, level and doesn’t have moisture problems.

  • 3. How do laminate floor panels lock together?
     

    There are many types of edge joining systems used to connect laminate flooring panels together. Some laminate floor connections snap together by hand while others require a light tap with a mallet and a tapping block. Still others use a combination of a “snap” click edge and a “bang” or “tap” click at the end of the panels. While most of the various systems work well to secure your laminate floor, it is important to read your laminate flooring installation instructions carefully. Familiarize yourself with how your flooring locks together before starting your installation and practice on a few pieces.

  • 4. Where can I install laminate flooring?
     

    Laminate flooring is an extremely versatile flooring product. It can be installed in virtually any room of your home, above or below ground, over wood or concrete. Keep in mind there are several locations that are not recommended. Because laminate flooring is a wood flooring product it is not recommended that laminates be installed in wet locations such as bathrooms, washrooms, saunas, enclosed porches or verandas, or anywhere that may require wet-mopping. Extended exposure to moisture of this type may cause the core of your laminate flooring to warp or swell. In some instances, with special installation procedures, it is possible to install laminate floors in bathrooms where water will not stand on the floor for any length of time. Other than that, laminate is very versatile: install it in living and dining rooms, kitchens, hallways, foyers, bedrooms, basements, stairs, offices, retail spaces and many other locations.

  • 5. What are the advantages of laminate flooring over those of solid hardwood flooring?
     

    Price. Laminate flooring is typically half the cost of traditional hardwood flooring. Sometimes the savings are even greater, depending on the type of flooring in question. And with recent innovations in technology, laminates look more and more like real wood. Laminate is easier to install than solid hardwood and many people can install it themselves without any previous carpentry experience whereas solid hardwood requires a specific level of expertise. With a laminate you won’t need nails and/or glue, as is the case with newer laminate locking systems. Therefore installation happens fast, in way less time than solid hardwoods can be installed and your finished floor will be scratch- and fade-resistant, two areas where solid hardwood is known to be more vulnerable.

  • 6. What do I need to know before I start installing my laminate floor?
     

    Think about this before you begin your installation:

    • Ensure that your subfloor is flat, dry, and smooth.
    • Always use underlayment under your laminate floor for soundproofing. Some laminates have underlayment built into the bottom layer, if not, find a good one.
    • Laminate flooring and underlayment/vapor barrier can be installed over concrete, wood flooring, vinyl tile, linoleum, tile, or virtually any other hard, flat surface.
    • Take extra care when installing laminate flooring over radiant heating. Ensure that you read both the laminate flooring and radiant heat system instructions carefully before beginning.
    • Read your laminate flooring manufacturer’s installation instructions carefully.
    • Allow your laminate flooring to acclimatize to the room where it will be installed for as long as possible (at least 48 hours) by opening the boxes and letting the laminate stay, uninstalled, in the room.
    • Inspect each laminate flooring panel carefully for defects or damage before installing it.
  • 7. What do I have to do before installation?
     

    You must acclimate your laminate boards for 48 hours in the room where they will be installed, before you install them. That means open the boxes and let the laminate boards adjust to their surroundings. Installation should take place at room temperature of at least 65°F (15°C). A floor surface temperature of 59°F and an overall room temperature of 64°F must be ensured before, during and three days after the installation.

  • 8. Do I have to keep staggering the planks in my laminate flooring installation?
     

    The first row should be started with a full plank, the second row with a 2/3 plank and the third row with a 1/3 plank. The distance between joints from one row to the next for the remainder of the installation must be 8″ or greater.

  • 9. How do I determine the direction in which to install my laminate flooring?
     

    To decide where to begin the layout of your floor, consider incoming light. It is usually best to install laminate flooring with the planks running parallel to light coming in windows or glass doors. For any installation, the starting wall should be as long and straight as possible.

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